Seeds of Life Bread Loaf / Pain de grains Vitalité

Here is the recipe for a whole grain, gluten-free, vegan bread that requires no kneading and is mess-free. It will change your life.

Seeds are Life

Seeds, like sunflower and linseed, contain high levels of essential fatty acids, the full profile of amino acids needed to form complete, digestible proteins, as well as vitamins A, B , C and E and the minerals calcium, magnesium, potassium, zinc, iron, selenium and manganese.

They are so rich in nutrients that you don’t need to eat a lot of them. As they are a low GI food, they are a good source of slow release energy. This helps keep blood sugar stable and makes you feel full for longer.

Sunflower Seeds

This bread consists mainly of sunflower seeds. Since they are rich in B-complex vitamins and are a good source of phosphorus, magnesium, iron, calcium, potassium, protein and vitamin E since they also contain trace elements, zinc, manganese, copper, chromium and carotene, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids … this makes it a vital bread for health.

A good natural source of zinc, sunflower seeds are popular immune boosters. They can also help protect against heart disease while their Vitamin B can help fight stress.

Flax or linseeds

Flax seeds are an excellent source of essential omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, which are necessary for most bodily functions, as well as dietary fiber and manganese. They are also rich in folate and vitamin B6 and in minerals, magnesium, phosphorus and copper.

In addition, flax seeds contain lignans, a type of phytoestrogen, which may help relieve symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes. Because they are rich in soluble fiber, flax seeds are also sometimes used to relieve constipation.

You now understand why I call it “Life” bread!

Other Healthy Seeds

This bread is adaptable to your mood and your pantry. You just have to change with something similar. Among the other vital seeds with which you can vary, there are sesame seeds, pumpkin seeds and hemp seeds. They are all as beneficial to your health as the seeds of flax and sunflowers. Do not hesitate to vary the tastes of your Life bread!

Seeds of Life Bread Loaf

To make this bread, you need …

  • 135g sunflower seeds
  • 90g flax seeds
  • 65g almonds (or hazelnuts, kernels …)
  • 145g oat flakes
  • 30ml chia seeds
  • 60ml psyllium
  • 5ml salt
  • 15ml maple syrup
  • 45ml coconut oil, melted
  • 350ml water

  1. In a large mixing bowl or directly in a bread loaf mold (in silicone or garnished with parchment) put all the dry ingredients and mix well.
  2. In a measuring cup, whisk the maple syrup, oil and water. Add them to the dry ingredients. Mix very well until the preparation is well soaked and the dough thickens. If it is too thick to stir, add a spoon of water at a time until it becomes manageable.
  3. If you prepare it in the mold, simply smooth the top with a spatula or the back of a spoon.
  4. If you prepare it in a bowl, transfer the dough into the mold and then smooth the top with a spatula or the back of a spoon.
  5. Let stand at least 2 hours or all day or even overnight. To make sure the dough is ready, it should keep its shape when you pull the sides of the pan or when you pull on the parchment paper.
  6. Preheat the oven to 180 C
  7. Place the bread pan on the middle rack and bake for 20 minutes.
  8. Remove the bread from the mold and return to the oven upside down directly on the rack and continue cooking for another 30-40 minutes.
  9. It is ready when it sounds hollow when it is tapped. Let cool completely before slicing.

In Health!

Chantal

Voici la recette d’un pain de grains entiers, sans gluten, végétalien qui nécessite aucun pétrissage et qui se fait sans gâchis. Il changera ta vie.

Les grains, c’est la vie

Les graines, comme de tournesol et de lins, contiennent des niveaux élevés d’acides gras essentiels, le profil complet des acides aminés nécessaires pour former des protéines complètes et digestibles, ainsi que les vitamines A, B, C et E et les minéraux calcium, magnésium, potassium, zinc, fer, sélénium et manganèse.

Les graines sont si riches en nutriments que tu n’as pas besoin d’en manger beaucoup. Comme elles sont un aliment à IG faible, elles sont une bonne source d’énergie à libération lente. Cela aide à maintenir la glycémie stable et à te sentir rassasié plus longtemps.

Tournesols

Ce pain est constitué principalement de graines de tournesols. Puisqu’elles sont riches en vitamines du complexe B et sont une bonne source de phosphore, magnésium, fer, calcium, potassium, protéines et vitamine E puis qu’elles contiennent également des oligo-éléments, du zinc, du manganèse, le cuivre, le chrome et le carotène, les acides gras monoinsaturés et polyinsaturés… cela en fait un pain vital pour la santé.

Une bonne source naturelle de zinc, les graines de tournesol sont des boosters immunitaires populaires. Elles peuvent également aider à protéger contre les maladies cardiaques tandis que leur vitamine B peut aider à lutter contre le stress.

Lin

Les graines de lin, elles, sont une excellente source d’acides gras essentiels oméga-3 et oméga-6, nécessaires à la plupart des fonctions corporelles, ainsi que des fibres alimentaires et du manganèse. Elles sont également riches en folate et en vitamine B6 et en minéraux, magnésium, phosphore et cuivre.

De plus, les graines de lin contiennent des lignanes, un type de phytoestrogène, qui pourrait aider à soulager les symptômes de la ménopause tels que les bouffées de chaleur. Parce qu’elles sont riches en fibres solubles, les graines de lin sont également parfois utilisées pour soulager la constipation.

Tu comprends maintenant pourquoi je l’appel pain “Vitalité”!

Les autres graines bénéfiques

Ce pain est adaptable à ton humeur et à ton garde-manger. Tu n’as qu’à échanger avec quelque chose de similaire. Parmi les autres graines vitale avec lesquelles tu peux varier, il y a les graines de sésames, de potiron ou citrouille et les graines de chanvre.

Elles sont toutes autant bénéfiques pour ta santé que les graines de lins et de tournesols. N’hésite pas à varier les goûts de ton pain Vitalité!

Pain de grains Vitalité

Pour faire ce pain, tu as besoin de…

  • 135g graines de tournesols
  • 90g graines de lin
  • 65g amandes (ou noisettes, cerneaux…)
  • 145g flocons d’avoine
  • 30ml graines de chia
  • 60ml psyllium
  • 5ml sel
  • 15ml sirop d’érable
  • 45ml huile de coco, fondue
  • 350ml eau

  1. Dans un grand bol à mélanger ou directement dans un moule à pain (en silicone ou garni de parchemin) mettre tous les ingrédients secs et bien mélanger.
  2. Dans une tasse à mesurer, fouettez le sirop d’érable, l’huile et l’eau. Les ajouter aux ingrédients secs. Mélanger très bien jusqu’à ce l’appareil soit bien trempé et que la pâte épaississe. Si elle est trop épaisse à remuer, ajouter une cuillère d’eau à la fois jusqu’à ce qu’elle devienne malléable.
  3. Si tu prépares dans le moule, simplement lisser le dessus avec une spatule ou le dos d’une cuillère.
  4. Si tu prépares dans un bol, transférer l’appareil dans le moule puis lisser le dessus avec une spatule ou le dos d’une cuillère.
  5. Laisser reposer au moins 2 heures ou toute la journée voir même toute une nuit. Afin de t’assurer que la pâte est prête, elle doit conserver sa forme quand tu tires les côtés du moule ou que tu tire sur le papier parchemin.
  6. Préchauffer le four à 180 C
  7. Placer le moule à pain sur la grille du centre et cuire 20 minutes.
  8. Retirer le pain du moule et remettre au four à l’envers directement sur la grille et poursuivre la cuisson un autre 30-40 minutes.
  9. Il est prêt lorsqu’il sonne creux quand on le tape. Laisser refroidir complètement avant de trancher.

Santé!

Chantal

12 Benefits of Growing a Vegetable Garden / 12 bienfaits de cultiver un potager

Grow what you put on your plate … A sentence that inspires and turns me on.

I have wanted to grow my own vegetables and fruits for years. But, I did not dare to embark on the adventure … I live in the city center and have only very little space I said to myself. I spend almost two (summer) months abroad, so I cannot take care of a veggie garden. I don’t have a green thumb. I do not know anything about it. In short, I had a lot of excuses.

Long live generous friends

A friend has a large garden and he kindly lend me a space so that I could make a vegetable garden there. With all the time that confinement imposed on me in addition to the travel ban, I could not refuse this opportunity. So I embarked on this great adventure.

Only pleasure and happiness

I asked advice from a friend who has a beautiful garden and a large vegetable patch. In addition to her tips, her references in terms of the vegetable patch, she gave me vegetables seedlings, herbs and flowers to plant in my little space!

I read about the arrangement of a vegetable patch, permaculture and everything I needed to know to be successful in this new adventure. I learn and continue my learning… in theory and in practice. I’m obviously still in my infancy.

As soon as the gardeners stores opened, I bought seedlings, plants, potting soil, horse poop and coconut shavings to mulch. Then with the help of the children, we organized the space and planted it all. Guaranteed excitement!

The difference between knowledge and practice

I already knew, despite all the excuses I mentioned, all the benefits and advantages of having a vegetable garden and growing your own vegetables (and fruits). I knew that no matter the size of the vegetable garden, whether in the ground in a garden or in a pot on a balcony or a window sill, growing vegetables and herbs provide health and multiple benefits.

Now that I put into practice and that I live this adventure, I can confirm to you that there are advantages and benefits, it is true. Besides, let’s talk about them!

12 benefits of growing a vegetable garden

  1. People who grow vegetables tend to eat more veggies;
  2. People who eat more vegetables tend to be healthier;
  3. Healthy people are less likely to get seriously ill;
  4. By starting to grow your own food, you begin to exercise control over your family’s food supply;
  5. Gardening is a skill set – fun to learn and invaluable once you understand it. And I would say that the ability to grow your own food is as fundamental to survival and well-being as reading, writing and computing;
  6. Your food is free of pesticides or herbicides. It is you who is in charge of quality since by developing a small vegetable garden it allows you to remove the pests by hand. In addition, your food will be much fresher with a higher nutritional profile since it will be eaten as soon as it is harvested and not several weeks later;
  7. Your vegetable garden naturally contains the healthiest foods on the planet (fruits, vegetables, legumes and roots) and what you grow, you will eat;
  8. When you start a vegetable garden, you have the opportunity to buy varieties that are so different from what you find at the supermarket. In addition to diversity, they taste better and are much more nutritious. The only drawback is that you have to eat them in a day or two after picking, which I find to be rather an advantage!
  9. Science clearly shows that the more you eat whole, unprocessed plant foods, the less likely you are to develop cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, obesity, and type 2 diabetes;
  10. You can slowly lower your grocery bill;
  11. Gardening gives a reason to spend time outdoors since we need sun, exercise and fresh air to be good, physically and mentally;
  12. Contact with the soil also has important health benefits. Getting dirty supports our immune system and many soil compounds can improve our mood and cognitive functioning. Some researchers have gone so far as to call the soil microbiome a “human antidepressant.”
  13. An added bonus: if you can compost your leftover food, you can save money on fertilizers by creating a nutrient cycle from the garden to the kitchen, then to the garden.

In Health!

Chantal

Health Benefits of a Vegetable Garden / Bénéfices sur la santé d’un potager

Faire pousser ce que tu mets dans ton assiette… Une phrase qui m’inspire et m’allume.

Ça fait des années que je souhaitais faire pousser mes légumes et mes fruits. Mais, je n’osais pas me lancer dans l’aventure… j’habite au centre-ville et n’ai que très peu d’espace me disais-je. Je passe presque deux mois (d’été) à l’étranger, je ne peux donc pas m’occuper d’une culture quelconque. Je n’ai pas le pouce vert. Je n’y connais rien. Bref, j’évoquais beaucoup d’excuses.

Vive les amis généreux

Un ami possède un grand jardin et il m’a gentiment offert un espace pour que je puisse y faire un potager. Avec tout le temps que le confinement m’imposait en plus de l’interdiction de voyager, je ne pouvais refuser cette opportunité. Je me suis donc lancé dans cette belle aventure.

Que du plaisir et du bonheur

J’ai demandé conseil à une amie qui a un magnifique jardin et un grand potager. En plus de ces conseils, ses références en matière de potager, elle m’a donné des plants de légumes, d’aromates et de fleurs à planter dans mon petit espace!

J’ai lu sur l’arrangement d’un potager, la permaculture et tout ce dont j’avais besoin de savoir pour réussir dans cette nouvelle aventure. J’apprends et poursuit mon apprentissage en théorie et en pratique. Je n’en suis évidemment qu’à mes balbutiements.

Dès que les pépinières ont ouverts leurs portes, j’ai acheté des plants, du terreau, du caca de cheval et des copeaux de coco pour pailler. Voilà qu’avec l’aide des enfants, nous organisons l’espace et plantons tout ça. Excitation garantie!

La différence entre le savoir et la pratique

Je connaissais déjà, malgré toutes les excuses que j’évoquais, tous les bienfaits et les avantages d’avoir son potager et de faire pousser ses propre légumes (et fruits). Je savais que peut importe la taille du potager, qu’il soit en pleine terre dans un jardin ou qu’il soit en pot sur un balcon ou le rebord d’une fenêtre, cultiver des légumes et des aromates procurent des avantages pour la santé et pour l’environnement.

Maintenant que je mets en pratique et que je vis cette aventure, je peux te confirmer qu’il y a des avantages et des bienfaits, c’est bien vrai. D’ailleurs, parlons-en!

12 bienfaits de cultiver ou d’avoir son potager

  1. Les gens qui cultivent des légumes ont tendance à en manger plus;
  2. Les personnes qui mangent plus de légumes ont tendance à être en meilleure santé;
  3. Les personnes en bonne santé sont moins susceptibles de tomber gravement malades;
  4. En commençant à cultiver ta propre nourriture, tu commences à exercer un contrôle sur l’approvisionnement alimentaire de ta famille;
  5. Le jardinage est un ensemble de compétences – amusant à apprendre et inestimable une fois que tu as compris. Et je dirais que la capacité de cultiver sa propre nourriture est aussi fondamentale pour la survie et le bien-être que la lecture, l’écriture et l’informatique;
  6. Tes aliments sont sans pesticides ou herbicides. C’est toi qui est en charge de la qualité puisqu’en développant un petit potager ça te permet de retirer les ravageurs à la main. En plus, ta nourriture sera beaucoup plus fraîche avec un profil nutritionnel plus élevé puisqu’elle sera mangé dès qu’elle sera récolté et non plusieurs semaines après;
  7. Ton potager contient naturellement les aliments les plus sains de la planète (fruits, légumes, légumineuses et racines) et ce que tu cultives, tu le mangeras;
  8. Lorsque tu démarres un potager, tu as la possibilité d’acheter des variétés tellement différentes de ce que tu retrouves au supermarché. En plus de la diversité, elles ont meilleur goût et sont beaucoup plus nutritives. Le seul inconvénient est que tu dois les manger dans un jour ou deux après la cueillette, ce que je trouve être plutôt un avantage!;
  9. La science montre clairement que plus tu consommes d’aliments végétaux entiers, non transformés, moins tu risques de développer des maladies cardiovasculaires, une pression artérielle élevée, l’obésité et le diabète de type 2;
  10. Tu peux tranquillement réduire ta facture d’épicerie;
  11. Le jardinage donne une raison de passer du temps à l’extérieur puisque nous avons besoin de soleil, d’exercice et d’air frais pour être bien, physiquement et mentalement;
  12. Le contact avec le sol présente également d’importants avantages pour la santé. Se salir soutient notre système immunitaire et de nombreux composés du sol peuvent améliorer notre humeur et notre fonctionnement cognitif. Certains chercheurs sont allés jusqu’à appeler le microbiome du sol un «antidépresseur humain».
  13. Un bonus : si tu peux composter tes restes de cuisine, tu peux ainsi économiser de l’argent sur les engrais en créant un cycle nutritif du jardin à la cuisine, puis au jardin.

Santé!

Chantal

Superfood Almond Fudge aux amandes et superaliments

Need a boost, add these adaptogens to your diet.

Here’s a delicious value-added snack. Why value added? Because 3 adaptogenic plants have been added to the original recipe.

What is an adaptogen?

An adaptogenic plant is a plant that increases the body’s ability to adapt to different stresses, whatever their origins.

What are adaptogens or superfoods for?

Adaptogenic plants provide a functional and variable response (modulator / regulator), specific to the needs of the individual. These plants are characterized by a non-specific action on the organism [wikipedia].

Adaptogens are general regulators of internal functions: they tend to increase the homeostatic capacities specific to our organism, in permanent search for balance.

The 3 adaptogens used in this recipe

Maca: Peruvian root used in cooking and as a dietary supplement. It is said to have aphrodisiac virtues without these being proven. Several controversial studies have focused on this plant and its benefits on hormonal balance and menopause (post- and peri-menopause).

Reishi: mushroom used in traditional Chinese and Japanese medicine for more than two millennia as fortifier or immune stimulant.

Aswaghanda: native to India this plant is recognized for its benefits on insomnia, on stress, on arthritic inflammation, anxiety, nervous disorders, respiratory disorders, etc.

Superfood Almond Fudge

To make these bites, you need …

  • 250g of whole almond butter
  • 50g of cold pressed coconut oil
  • 45ml of maple syrup
  • 1ml of salt

Adaptogens

  • 5ml of each: maca , reishi and ashwagandha

  1. Put all the ingredients in a bowl in a double boiler to melt the coconut oil and slightly soften the almond butter. When these are liquefied, add the maple syrup, salt and adaptogens.
  2. Pour the mixture in a small dish lined with parchment paper (8 × 6) or in a mold for small pieces.
  3. Put in the freezer for at least 2 hours.
  4. Once frozen, gently remove the fudge (lift the parchment paper) and cut into pretty squares or unmold.
  5. Keep in the freezer in an airtight container and take out 5 min before eating.

In Health!

Chantal

Frozen Superfood Almond Fudge aux amandes et superaliments congelés

Besoin d’un coup de pouce, ajoute ces adaptogenes à ton régime alimentaire.

Voici un en-cas délicieux à valeur ajoutée. Pourquoi à valeur ajoutée? Parce que 3 plantes adaptogenes ont été ajoutées à la recette originale.

Qu’est-ce qu’un adaptogène?

Une plante adaptogène est une plante augmentant la capacité du corps à s’adapter aux différents stress, quelles que soient leurs origines.

À quoi sert les adaptogènes ou les superaliments?

Les plantes adaptogènes apportent une réponse fonctionnelle et variable (modulateur/régulateur), spécifique aux besoins de l’individu. Ces plantes se caractérisent par une action non spécifique sur l’organisme [wikipedia].

Les adaptogènes sont des régulateurs généraux des fonctions internes : ils tendent à accroître les capacités homéostatiques propre à notre organisme, en recherche permanente d’équilibre.

Les 3 adaptogenes utilisés dans cette recette

Maca : racine péruvienne utilisé dans la cuisine et comme supplément alimentaire. On lui prête des vertus aphrodisiaques sans que celles-ci soient prouvées. Plusieurs études controversées ont portées sur cette plante et sur ses bienfaits sur le balancement hormonal et la ménopause (post- et peri-ménopause).

Reishi : champignon utilisé dans les médecines traditionnelles chinoise et japonaise depuis plus de deux millénaires comme fortifiant ou stimulant immunitaire.

Aswaghanda : originaire de l’Inde cette plante est reconnu pour ses bienfaits sur l’insomnie, sur le stress, sur l’inflammation arthritique, l’anxiété, les troubles nerveux, les troubles respiratoires, etc.

Fudge aux amandes et superaliments

Pour faire ces bouchées, tu as besoin de …

  • 250g de beurre d’amande entière
  • 50g d’huile de noix de coco pressé à froid
  • 45ml de sirop d’érable
  • 1ml de sel

Adaptogènes

5ml de chaque : maca, reishi et ashwagandha

  1. Mettre tous les ingrédients dans un bol au bain-marie pour faire fondre l’huile de coco et légèrement assouplir le beurre d’amandes. Lorsque ceux-ci sont liquéfiés, ajouter le sirop d’érable, le sel et les adaptogènes.
  2. Verser le mélange dans un petit plat doublé de papier parchemin(8 × 6) ou dans un moule à petites bouchées.
  3. Mettre au congélateur pendant au moins 2 heures
  4. Une fois figé, retirer délicatement le fudge (soulever le papier parchemin) et le couper en jolis carrés ou démouler.
  5. Conserver au congélateur dans un récipient hermétique et sortir 5 min avant de manger.

Santé!

Chantal

Spinach Feta Buddha Bowl épinards feta

Here is a simple and very satisfying idea of a Buddha Bowl.

As a base, spinach leaves. Simple. But, you can use what you have as leafy greens in your fridge!

Cereals or grains

For grains, I chose durum wheat semolina because it was the one that was cooked and that had to be eaten. Obviously, you could replace with the cereal of your choice such as quinoa, freekeh, bulgur, etc.

Protein

For protein, I add feta cheese. I really like its curd and salty taste. I crumble it over the spinach leaves. These two ingredients go perfectly together. If you use another variety of green leaves, the choice of protein may vary.

Extras

To further enhance it’s taste, other ingredients are essential. Such as finely chopped red onion, pomegranate seeds, sprouted seeds. What would have been nice with that and that I haven’t added is sesame seeds. You can add whatever you have on hand, like raisins or dried cranberries, a white or young onion or a shallot. And why not sunflower seeds?

Finishing touch

To tie all these tastes, I made a vinaigrette based on olive oil and lemon juice mixed with cumin and sumac. But, you can use another citrus or balsamic vinegar or wine vinegar for example. Or something else like tamari with noble yeast or mayonnaise!

You probably understood by now, the idea is to use what you have in your fridge and your pantry then dare to assemble ingredients to create a unique taste, a taste that you like!

If you are afraid to create your own, this recipe is “full proof”! Tested and approved!

Bon appétit!

In health!

Chantal


Voici une idée simple et combien satisfaisante d’un Buddha Bowl.

Comme base, des feuilles d’épinards. Simple. Mais, tu peux utiliser ce que tu as comme feuilles vertes dans ton frigo!

Céréales ou grains

Comme céréales, j’ai choisi la semoule de blé dure parce que c’est celle-là qui était cuite et qui devait être mangé. Évidemment, tu pourrais remplacer par la céréale de ton choix comme par exemple du quinoa, du freekeh, boulgour, etc.

Protéines

Comme protéines, j’avais du fromage feta. J’aime beaucoup son goût caillé et salé. Je l’émiette, sur les feuilles d’épinards. Ces deux ingrédients se marient à merveille. Si tu utilises une autre variété de feuilles vertes, le choix de la protéine peut varier.

Extras

Pour agrémenter davantage, d’autres ingrédients s’imposent. Tels que l’oignon rouge finement haché, les grains de pomme grenade, les graines germées. Ce qui aurait bien été avec cela et que je n’ai pas ajouté est les graines de sésames. Tu peux ajouter ce que tu as sous la main, comme des raisins secs ou canneberges séchées, un oignon blanc ou jeune ou une échalote. Et pourquoi pas des graines de tournesols?

Touche finale

Pour lier tous ces goûts, j’ai fait une vinaigrette à base d’huile d’olive et de jus de citron mélangés avec du cumin et du sumac. Mais, tu peux utiliser une autre agrume ou un vinaigre balsamique ou un vinaigre de vin par exemple. Ou carrément autre chose comme du tamari avec de la levure noble ou de la mayonnaise!

Tu l’auras compris, l’idée est d’utiliser ce que tu as dans ton frigo et ton garde-manger puis d’oser assembler des ingrédients pour créer un goût unique, un goût qui te plaît!

Si tu as peur de créer, cette recette est “full proof”! Testé et approuvé!

Bon appétit et, santé!

Chantal

Mung Bean Dip (Hummus) / Trempette (Houmous) au haricot mungo

Inspired by hummus, this recipe is not made with chickpea puree but rather with mung bean puree. In fact, any legume can replace chickpea. Therefore, we can simply no longer call our dip “hummus”. Why? Because the term “hummus” means “chickpea” in Arabic!

But you understand, I was inspired by the same recipe but simply changed the chickpea by the mung bean. So if you don’t have mung on hand but let’s say white beans … well you will get an equally excellent dip.

Benefits of legumes

Mung beans, like most legumes, are rich in nutrients for our health such as fiber, carbohydrates and antioxidants. They also contain important minerals such as iron, zinc, copper and potassium. The mung bean is particularly rich in folate or vitamin B9. In addition, legumes are not expensive at all. It’s great to have in your pantry during this time of confinement. Dry food is a durable and economical commodity.

Mung bean dip

To make this recipe, you need …

  • 250ml mung beans, cooked and drained (keep some of the cooking or canned water)
  • 30ml sesame puree or tahini
  • 15 to 30 ml olive oil
  • 15ml lemon juice
  • 1 clove of garlic
  • 3 ml cumin powder
  • 3 ml salt

  1. Put all the ingredients in a food processor except the olive oil. Pulse to obtain a homogeneous puree. Add the olive oil in a drizzle.
  2. If the dip is too dry, add a little cooking water and / or olive oil.
  3. Serve with raw vegetables and pita breads

Health!

Chantal

Mung Bean Dip / Trempette aux haricots mungo
Mung Bean Dip / Trempette aux haricots mungo

Inspirée de l’houmous, cette recette n’est pas faite avec de la purée de pois chiche mais bien avec de la purée d’haricots mungo. En fait, n’importe quelle légumineuse peut remplacer le pois chiche. Dès lors, on ne peut tout simplement plus appeler notre trempette “houmous”. Pourquoi? Parce que le terme “houmous” signifie “pois chiche” en arabe!

Mais tu l’auras compris, je me suis inspiré de la même recette puis j’ai simplement changé le pois chiche par le mungo. Donc, si tu n’as pas de mungo sous la main mais disons des haricots blancs… et bien tu obtiendras une trempette tout aussi excellente.

Bienfaits des légumineuses

L’haricot mungo, comme la plupart des légumineuses, est riche en éléments nutritifs pour notre santé comme des fibres, des glucides et des antioxydants. Elles contiennent aussi d’importants minéraux tels que le fer, le zinc, le cuivre et le potassium. L’haricot mungo est particulièrement riche en folate ou vitamine B9. En plus, les légumineuses ne coûtent pas cher du tout. C’est excellent à avoir dans son garde-manger en cette période de confinement. Les aliments secs sont de denrées durables et économiques.

Trempette d’haricots mungo

Pour faire cette recette, tu as besoin de…

  • 250ml haricots mungo, cuits et égouttés (conserver un peu d’eau de cuisson ou de la conserve)
  • 30ml purée de sésame ou tahini
  • 15 à 30ml huile olive
  • 15ml jus de citron
  • 1 gousse d’ail
  • 3ml cumin en poudre
  • 3ml sel

  1. Mettre tous les ingrédients dans un hachoir (food processor) sauf l’huile d’olive. Pulser pour obtenir une purée homogène. Ajouter, en filet, l’huile d’olive.
  2. Si la trempette est trop sèche, ajouter un peu d’eau de cuisson et/ou de l’huile d’olive.
  3. Servir avec crudités et pains pita

Santé!

Chantal